Accessibility Tools

  • 8 Signs Of Mallet Finger

    A mallet finger, sometimes called “baseball finger” because it can be common in baseball players, is a deformity of the finger typically caused by injury. You may have a mallet finger if you’ve recently jammed, cut, or broken your fingertip. Most likely, a hard object like a ball struck the tip of your finger or your finger was bent forcefully when lifting a heavy object or performing a daily task.

    Read more

  • Jones Fracture of the Foot: Symptoms, Treatment, and Recovery

    Jones fractures are caused by sudden force on the outside of the foot when twisted, usually with the heel off the ground. This can occur from overuse, playing sports, dancing, or a slip-and-fall accident.

    Read more

  • What are some possible early warning signs of osteoporosis?

    Osteoporosis causes bones to become porous and weaker, and many people do not have noticeable symptoms until they experience an injury or fracture. However, early signs of the condition can include receding gums, weakened grip strength, and brittle fingernails.

    Read more

  • Clavicle Fracture Treatment: When Is Surgery Necessary?

    Clavicle fractures, or broken collarbones, are typically treated without surgery. There is some evidence, though, to suggest that clavicle fractures may heal faster and more predictably when surgical repair is done.

    Read more

  • How long does it take to recover from a torn ACL?

    Damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common yet severe knee injury. Most people who experience a torn ACL recover in 3–12 months, depending on injury severity and goals for rehabilitation.

    Read more

  • How to treat hip bursitis

    Hip bursitis is inflammation of the bursae of the hips. Treatment usually involves anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, and rest.

    Read more

  • McMurray test: What a positive result means

    The McMurray test is a physical examination doctors use for knee injuries. A positive McMurray test means a person likely has a meniscal tear

    Read more

  • Lower Risk of Revision Surgery After Arthroscopic Versus Open Irrigation and Débridement for Shoulder Septic Arthritis

    Risk of revision I&D was markedly lower after arthroscopic I&D compared with open, although the protective benefit was limited to patients aged 65 years or older. Arthroscopy was also associated with decreased costs, length of stay, and complications.

    Read more

  • Which types of arthritis can affect the arm?

    Arthritis in the arm can cause pain, swelling, and stiffness in the elbow, shoulder, or wrists. It may affect one or more joints, depending on the type of arthritis a person has.

    Read more

  • What to know about os trigonum syndrome

    The os trigonum is an accessory, or extra bone, that sometimes develops behind the ankle. It does not always cause symptoms, but when it causes pain, due to irritation and inflammation, a doctor will refer to this discomfort as os trigonum syndrome.

    Read more

Pages [1] 2 3 4 5 6 of 8 | Next | Last